15 Of Our Favorite Wolf Like Dogs

In recent years, wolf hybrids have become somewhat of an intriguing phenomenon in the dog-owning community. The topic is a controversial one, yes, but that hasn’t stopped dog lovers and some wild-at-heart animal enthusiasts from taking a step towards the wild side and adopting a pooch that is part dog and part wolf.

Crossbreeding isn’t new, but selling wolf cross breeds is somewhat of a newer practice. Or at least it’s a foreign idea to many of us. And there’s a reason owning such a wild hybrid could cause many people to scratch their heads or even protest out of concern.

Yes, it’s true that dogs are descendants from wolves, but a lot has gone into ensuring that the modern-day dog is domesticated. Wolf hybrids pose risks, don’t they?

My sister owns a wolf hybrid. Everyone in her immediate circle warned against it. They said these crossbreeds were unpredictable, aggressive, difficult, and time consuming.

What she ended up with was a sweet, totally chill, mild-mannered, eager to please 110 pound lapdog. Is this everyone’s story? I don’t know.

What I do know is that many wolf dog hybrids are more difficult to raise than your typical domesticated dog and for good reason. They require lots of time and energy, lots of exercise, playtime, socialization, training, and patience.

What’s more, many wolfdog hybrids wind up surrendered by unwitting owners who find themselves in over their heads with the demands of such a dog. The lucky ones are handed over to shelters and rehabilitation centers specializing in their unique needs. The unlucky ones are put down due to their wolfy look.

And yet, people keep buying these wolf cross dogs. Why?

I’ll be honest. There is something magical about owning or evening hanging out with a big, fluffy, wolf-looking dog breed, so I get the hype. With that being said, it’s still important for dog owners to do lots of research before jumping the gun and commiting to a dog who is born with a good chunk of wolf DNA. In fact, it’s important for any potential dog owner to do some digging on the dog they have their heart set on.

The truth is, wolf dog hybrids could make wonderful pets for the right person, but they are certainly not the right dog for everyone.

That’s why we want to give you some options on wolf like dog breeds. Perhaps a wolfdog hybrid isn’t for you, but another wolf-looking dog breed is? You’ll never know until you get to researching.

To make it easy for you, we’ve compiled a list of our 15 of our favorite wolf like dog breeds. With crossbreeds, purebreds, and even some wolfdogs added to the list below, we are sure you will satisfy your wolf dog cravings and fall in love with one of these majestic looking pups.

Let’s start with one of the world’s most famous wolf-looking dogs – the Siberian Husky!

1. The Siberian Husky


The Siberian Husky is a wolf look alike with a family-friendly temperament.

Origin: Siberia

Temperament: Devoted, playful, mischievous, and affectionate

Weight: 35 – 60 Pounds

Coat Type: Double Coated and sheds heavily

Lifespan: 12 – 14 years

Common Health Issues: Cataracts, corneal dystrophy, progressevie retinal atrophy, uveodermatologic syndrome, follicular dysplasia, hip dysplasia, zinc deficiency, and hypothyroidism.

Pros: 

  • Huskies are beautiful
  • They are naturally clean dogs with weather-resistant coats
  • They are playful and outgoing
  • They are independant and intelligent

Cons: 

  • They shed heavily
  • Huskies have lots of energy
  • They howl 
  • They have a high prey drive
  • Huskies are furry houdinis

Let’s Learn More About the Siberian Husky!

Siberian Huskies are friendly dogs who make wonderful family pets. They do best in homes with older children who can run and play with them and with active families who are able to offer them plenty of outdoor time and lots of exercise.

Huskies can be prone to destructive behaviors when left alone so it is wise to make sure they are properly exercised. Your Husky dog will also benefit from crate training at an early age to help keep them and your belongings safe.

2. The American Eskimo


The American Eskimo is both beautiful and intelligent. 

Origin: America, Germany

Temperament: Playful, outgoing, happy, and intelligent.

Weight: (Toy) 6 – 10 Pounds, (Miniature) 10 – 20 Pounds, (Standard) 25 – 30 Pounds

Coat Type: Double coated, sheds

Lifespan: 13 – 15 Years

Common Health Issues: Patellar luxation, canine hip dysplasia, progressive retinal atrophy, and diabetes.

Pros: 

  • American Eskimos comes in three different sizes
  • They are playful and outgoing
  • They make great watchdogs
  • They are intelligent and learn quickly

Cons: 

  • They are high-energy dogs who require lots of exercise
  • American Eskimos can be vocal and like to bark
  • They can be stubborn and independent
  • They can be aloof with strangers
  • They shed heavily

Let’s Learn More About the American Eskimo!

American Eskmios are beloved for their friendly, happy nature. They love their families and are spirited, loving companions who enjoy active households and going on adventures.

These beautiful dogs come in three different size varieties, making them ideal for different home types and living situations. Regardless of their size, American Eskimos require daily exercise and routine upkeep in their coats, and they should be socialized and trained at an early age to help ensure they grow up happy and confident in all types of situations.

3. The German Shepherd


German Shepherds are intelligent and famous for their work as police and military dogs. 

Origin: Germany

Temperament: Loyal, confident, brave, and intelligent

Weight: 50 – 90 Pounds

Coat Type: Double layered and shedding

Lifespan: 7 – 10 Years

Common Health Issues: Canine hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, epilepsy, hemophilia, bloat, diabetes, cataracts, and degenerative disc disease.

Pros: 

  • German Shepherds are athletic and active
  • They are work-minded and can help out with chores
  • They are devoted to their family members
  • German Shepherds make wonderful guard dogs
  • They are very smart and eager to learn

Cons: 

  • They need lots of exercise and mental stimulation
  • Can be prone to destructive behaviors
  • Not best suited for novice dog owners
  • They need lots of socialization with other people and animals
  • They need consistent training throughout their lives
  • They have a high prey drive
  • German Shepherds can come with some serious health issues

Let’s Learn More About the German Shepherd!

The German Shepherd is famous for his work as a police and military dog, and while he is extremely intelligent, this breed is not recommended for first time dog owners.

German Shepherds require lots of commitment, time, training, and exercise. They have a working history and are not happy just being idle pets or companion dogs. They will want to be active members of the household and participate in chores. They are happiest when they have jobs to do.

Experts recommend training and socialising the German Shepherd early on and providing him lots of mental stimulation like puzzle games, mental exercises, and brain games to keep him occupied and from becoming destructive when left alone.

4. The Wolfdog (Wolf Hybrid)


Wolfdog hybrids are both fascinating and controversial. 

Origin: North America and Europe

Types of Common Wolfdogs:

  • The Saarioos Wolfhond
  • The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog
  • The American Tundra Shepherd
  • The Kunming Wolfdog

Temperament: Intelligent, loyal, energetic, affectionate, and active.

Weight: 75 – 130 Pounds

Coat Type: Double coated, shedding

Lifespan: 6 – 8 Years

Common Health Issues: Heartworm, respiratory issues, and tumors.

Pros: 

  • Wolfdogs are generally healthy dogs throughout their life
  • Wolfdogs are affectionate and bond closely with their people
  • They are trainable and eager to please when trained young

Cons: 

  • A wolfdogs’ temperament can’t always be predicted
  • They are large dogs who shed heavily
  • They require lots of exercise
  • Wolf dogs need early socialization and training during puppyhood and then consistently throughout their lifetime.
  • Not all states and regions allow ownership of wolf dogs as pets
  • They need lots of space to run and don’t do well in kennels for long periods
  • They are not recommended for homes with small children
  • Some veterinarians won’t treat wolfdog hybrids
  • Wolfdogs are not as predictable as domesticated dogs and can pose dangers to people and other pets.

Let’s Learn More About the Wolfdog Hybrid!

The Wolf Dog hybrid is a controversial topic amongst dog enthusiasts. While some advocates for the crossbreed insist that these dogs make great pets, others point out that their temperamental traits can be unpredictable and will depend on genetic traits as well as the purebred dog the wolf is mixed with.

Like all dogs on this list, the Wolf Dog hybrid will need early socialization and proper training throughout his lifetime. He should also be supervised around children and other household pets and children should be educated on how to properly interact with dogs so that playtime is fun and safe for all involved.

5. The Northern Inuit Dog


The Northern Inuit Dog was bred to look like a wolf with domesticated dog qualities.

Origin: United Kingdom

Temperament: Gentle, family-oriented, loyal, friendly, and affectionate.

Weight: 55 – 110 Pounds

Coat Type: Double layered, dense, shedding.

Lifespan: 12 – 14 Years

Common Health Issues: Hip dysplasia, epilepsy, elbow dysplasia, achondrodysplasia, and degenerative myelopathy.

Pros: 

  • Northern Inuit Dogs are intelligent and quick to learn
  • They are a wolfdog without having much wolf in them
  • They are gentle and known for their affectionate nature

Cons: 

  • Northern Inuit Dogs can be stubborn and hard headed
  • They are best suited for experienced dog owners
  • They need lots of exercise and room to burn energy

Let’s Learn More About the Northern Inuit Dog!

If you were inspired to get yourself a wolf dog after watching HBO’s hit, Game of Thrones, then you’ll be thrilled to learn that a group of Northern Inuit dogs played the epic direwolves found and presented to us in the first season.

That’s right! Northern Inuit Dogs starred in GOT and had us all saying “we want a cool wolf sidekick named Ghost!” (Or any other cool wolf sounding dog’s name). But what is really behind that gorgeous, wolf-like persona of the Northern Inuit Dog?

The Northern Inuit Dog is actually a crossbreed who came about in the 1980s when wolf dog enthusiast Eddie Harrison wanted to create a domestic dog that looked close to, if not almost just like, a wild wolf.

The result is a domesticated dog with very little wolf DNA who has the temperament of a docile Husky but looks like a fierce predator.

While not officially recognized by any major breed clubs, the Northern Inuit is recognized by several of his own breed clubs. So there.

6. The Alaskan Malamute


Alaskan Malamutes are working dogs who love their families.

Origin: Alaska

Temperament: Loving, devoted, playful, and dignified.

Weight: 75 – 85 Pounds

Coat Type: Double coated, thick, heavy shedding.

Lifespan: 10 – 14 Years

Common Health Issues: Canine hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, chondrodysplasia, thrombopathia, hypothyroidism, inherited polyneuropathy, von Willebrand’s disease, day blindness, ear infections, and oral issues.

Pros: 

  • Alaskan Malamutes are highly social
  • They are very intelligent
  • Alaskan Malamutes are loyal and devoted to their family
  • They can make great guard dogs and protectors
  • They are outgoing and playful and enjoy older children

Cons: 

  • Alaskan Malamute dogs can be tough to train
  • They are independent and can be stubborn
  • Alaskan Malamutes are large and strong and will need to be trained early on leash walking and have a solid recall.
  • They require daily exercise and mental stimulation

Let’s Learn More About the Alaskan Malamute!

The Alaskan Malamute is known for his gorgeous, wolf-like appearance and hard working background. This powerful, intelligent dog breed makes a wonderful companion for families who are outgoing and enjoy being active.

Alaskan Malamutes need lots of exercise and should be trained using positive reinforcement methods like treats and praise.

They are large, playful dogs and make great doggy additions to families with older kiddos.

7. The Samoyed


Did you know that the Samoyed has a natural smile? That’s why he is nicknamed the “smiling Sammy!”

Origin: Asia

Temperament: Go with the flow, gentle, and affectionate.

Weight: 35 – 65 Pounds

Coat Type: Double layered, dense, shedding.

Lifespan: 12 – 14 Years.

Common Health Issues: Hip dysplasia, eye issues, heart issues, and dental issues.

Pros: 

  • Samoyeds do great with families with children
  • They are adaptable to different living situations like apartments or homes
  • Samoyeds are highly social
  • They are quick to learn and easy to train
  • They are known as “Smiling Sammies” due to their happy expressions

Cons: 

  • Samoyeds are very heavy shedders
  • They require consistent grooming and upkeep
  • They need lots of daily exercise to stay happy and healthy
  • Samoyed puppies through a breeder can be expensive
  • They have a high prey drive
  • They can be stubborn and independent

Let’s Learn More About the Samoyed!

Did you know that the Samoyed has a natural smile? That’s why he is nicknamed the “smiling Sammy!”

The Samoyed is also one of the worlds’ most ancient breeds and is beloved for his laid back nature and beautiful look. Samoyeds make great family dogs due to their gentle nature, however they can have a high prey drive and should be taught a good recall early on.

Although they do require daily exercise, Samoyeds are adaptable dogs and can do well in different home types including apartments.

8. The Swedish Lapphund


The adorable Swedish Lapphund is known for his barking skills. 

Origin: Sweden

Temperament: Spirited, alert, loving, clever, and playful.

Weight: 30 – 45 Pounds

Coat Type: Double coated, shedding.

Lifespan: 12 – 14 Years

Common Health Issues: Hip dysplasia, diabetes, and progressive retinal atrophy.

Pros: 

  • Swedish Lapphunds are intelligent dogs
  • They are easy to train and eager to please
  • They are athletic and enjoy activities
  • They are gentle and loving to their families
  • They are not known to be aggressive, although they can be territorial (see below)

Cons: 

  • Swedish Lapphunds shed heavily
  • They can be stubborn
  • Swedish Lapphunds can be vocal and are known to bark when excited
  • They have strong guarding instincts and can be territorial
  • They need consistent training and socialization throughout their lifetime

Let’s Learn More About the Swedish Lapphund!

The Swedish Lapphund is a loving, intelligent dog who hails from Sweden. Bred as a working dog, this intelligent pup needs lots of mental stimulation and exercise to stay happy and healthy.

And while they are not known to be aggressive, Swedish Lapphund dogs can have guarding instincts and tend to be territorial. When properly trained and socialized, however, Swedish Lapphunds make great guard dogs as they are quite vocal.

With that being said, if you don’t want a dog who may bark excessively, then you probably shouldn’t get a Swedish Lapphund unless you are really willing to invest a lot of time in training, because barking is one of their favorite pastimes!

9.The American Alsatian


The American Alsatian is as sweet as he is beautiful. 

Origin: United States

Temperament: Calm, playful, intelligent, alert, and loyal.

Weight: 90 – 120 Pounds

Coat Type: Double coat, medium length, thick, shedding.

Lifespan: 12 – 15 Years

Common Health Issues: Arthritis, hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, bladder issues, epilepsy, seizures, panosteitis, allergies, myelofibrosis, masticatory, and cardiac issues including enlarged heart.

Pros: 

  • American Alsatians do very well in family settings
  • They are attentive to their people and have a strong emotional intelligence, making them great therapy dogs
  • American Alsatians only need moderate exercise

Cons: 

  • They are heavy shedders who need constant grooming
  • The American Alsatian can be sensitive to heat and does best in colder climates
  • They are very large and can be expensive to care for

Let’s Learn More About the American Alsatian!

The American Alsatian is a large dog who, in spite of his size and fierce look, makes a great family dog for active families with older children.

He requires only moderate exercise and is said to be so attentive to his human family that he makes a wonderful therapy and service dog to those in need.

This gorgeous breed is loving, calm, gentle, and loyal. However, potential owners should note that these are very large dogs who can be expensive to care for and feed and require constant upkeep with their thick, heavily shedding coat.

10. The Irish Wolfhound


The Irish Wolfhound is a brave dog who once took on predators much larger than himself. 

Origin: Ireland

Temperament: Laid back, courageous, proud, and agreeable.

Weight: 105 – 120 Pounds

Coat Type: Double coat that is harsh, wirey, and sheds moderately throughout the year.

Lifespan: 6 – 8 Years

Common Health Issues: Bloat, pneumonia, heart disease, cancers, hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, eye issues, and liver shunt.

Pros: 

  • Irish Wolfhounds are loved for their gentle nature
  • They are calm and affectionate
  • They are patient and do well with children
  • Irish wolfhounds make friends with everyone they meet so long as they are properly socialized at an early age (see below)

Cons: 

  • Irish Wolfhounds are very large and can be expensive
  • They need outside space to run and play
  • They can be jumpy, especially when they are young
  • They are prone to destructive behaviors if they become bored or stressed
  • Irish Wolfhounds require consistent and proper socialization at an early age
  • They have a high prey drive
  • They have a short life expectancy and come with some expensive and serious health issues
  • Irish Wolfhound puppies can be expensive

Let’s Learn More About the Irish Wolfhound!

So yes, we know that the Irish Wolfhound isn’t wolflike in his physical appearance, but this badass dog breed was once known to take on wolves much larger than himself to keep his family and his homestead safe.

What is more wolf-like than that?

The Irish Wolfhound was also once used as an ancient war dog, but these days he makes for an agreeable and loving companion.

11. The Belgian Tervuren


The Belgian Tervuren is a unique looking and beautiful wolf-like dog breed.

Origin: Belgium

Temperament: Energetic, devoted, alert, intelligent, and protective

Weight:  44 – 66 Pounds

Coat Type: Double coated, shedding.

Lifespan: 12 – 14 Years

Common Health Issues: Hypothyroidism, hip dysplasia, allergies, elbow dysplasia, seizures, and progressive retinal atrophy.

Pros: 

Cons: 

  • Belgian Tervuren dogs require lots of exercise
  • They need lots of mental stimulation
  • They can be prone to destructive behaviours
  • Belgian Tervuren dogs have strong guarding instincts and must be socialized and trained from an early age.
  • They have a strong prey drive
  • They have strong herding instinct
  • Belgian Tervurens are heavy shedders

Let’s Learn More About the Belgian Tervuren!

The Belgian Tervuren hails from a herding and working background, so it comes as no surprise that this dog breed is highly intelligent.

He will need lots of exercise and mental stimulation to stay happy and healthy and will do best in homes that have lots of outdoor space for him to run and play.

Families with other household pets and children should also be aware that the Belgian Tervuren may be prone to herding instinct, even if that means he is herding all the children and other household pets into the kitchen for dinner time.

12. The Kugsha Dog


This wolf hybrid was created in California and is known for his affectionate nature. 

Origin: United States

Type: Wolf Dog Hybrid

Temperament: Work-oriented, intelligent, independent, and affectionate.

Weight: 100+ Pounds

Coat Type: Double layered, dense, shedding.

Lifespan: 12 – 14 Years

Common Health Issues: Arthritis, patellar luxation, and hip dysplasia

  • Kugsha Dogs are primarily healthy dogs
  • Kugsha Dogs are independent but bond closely with their family
  • When trained young, they learn quickly and are eager to please

Cons: 

  • Kugsha Dogs’ temperament can’t always be predicted
  • Kugsha Dogs are large dogs who shed heavily
  • They require lots of exercise
  • Kugsha Dogs will need to have lots of early socialization and training during puppyhood and consistently throughout their life.
  • Not all states and regions allow ownership of wolf dogs like Kugsha Dogs as pets
  • Kugsha Dogs need open space to run and lots of exercise
  • They are not recommended for homes with children or other, smaller household pets
  • Some veterinarians won’t treat wolfdog hybrids like Kugsha Dogs
  • Kugsha Dogs’ temperaments are not as predictable as domesticated dogs and can pose dangers to people and other pets.

Let’s Learn More About the Kugsha Dog!

Like the other wolf hybrid on this list, the Kugsha dog is known for his wolf-like appearance and for having temperamental traits that may not always be easily predictable.

However, advocates for this dog say he is affectionate, intelligent, and eager to please. Still, the Kugsha Dog is a heavy shedder and will require plenty of exercise and mental stimulation to stay happy and healthy.

And while the Kugsha is an independent dog who enjoys his time and space, he will not enjoy being left alone for long periods of time.

13. The Tamaskan Dog


The large, wild looking Tamaskan Dog is known for his social nature. 

Origin: United Kingdom/Finland

Temperament: Social, patient, clever, eager to please.

Weight:  50 – 100 Pounds

Coat Type: Double coat, dense, and shedding.

Lifespan: 14 – 15 Years

Common Health Issues: Hip dysplasia, cryptorchidism, degenerative myelopathy, and epilepsy.

Pros: 

  • Tamaskan dogs are good natured and make good family pets when well trained and socialized
  • They are easy to train and eager to please
  • Tamasakn dogs are loyal and dependable companions
  • They are friendly and outgoing

Cons: 

  • Tamaskan dogs can be prone to destructive behaviors if not properly exercised
  • They need lots of mental and physical stimulation
  • They should be supervised around small children due to their very large size
  • Tamaskan dogs can have a high prey drive

Let’s Learn More About the Tamaskan Dog!

Tamaskan dogs look utterly wild, but they are actually known for their good nature and happy disposition. When properly trained and socialized, Tamaskan dogs make great family pets. They are intelligent and eager to please, friendly, and outgoing.

However, they can be prone to destructive behaviors if left home alone too often or if they are not properly exercised or trained.

14. The Akita Inu


Akita Inu dogs are famous for their devotion and loyalty.

Origin: Japan

Temperament: Independant, intelligent, affectionate, devoted, and courageous.

Weight: 75 – 120 Pounds

Coat Type: Double layered, thick, dense, shedding.

Lifespan: 10 – 15 Years

Common Health Issues: Hip dysplasia, progressive retinal atrophy, acquired myasthenia gravis, von Willebrand disease, immune system disorders, and skin issues.

Pros: 

  • The Akita Inu is beautiful and impressive to look at
  • He only needs a moderate amount of exercise
  • Akita Inu dogs are quiet and don’t bark much
  • They are independant and enjoy their space

Cons: 

  • Can be aggressive if not properly socialized
  • They can be aggressive towards other household pets
  • Akita Inus can be stubborn and hardheaded
  • They have strong guarding instincts
  • Akita Inus can be territorial
  • Not recommended for homes with small children
  • Not recommended for novice dog owners
  • Akita Inus are heavy shedders

Let’s Learn More About the Akita Inu!

Akita Inus are controversial dogs who some claim can be aggressive. However, others claim these are intelligent, sweet, and devoted companions.

Most experts agree that socializing and training your Akita Inu at an early age will help to reduce or alleviate any unwanted behavioral issues in the breed.

Akita Inus are intelligent and can be independant and hard headed. They will respond best to positive reinforcement training and do best in homes with older children who understand how to respectfully and gently interact with a dog.

15. The Shiba Inu


The Shiba Inu is a smaller, more compact wolf like dog breed who is happy and confident. 

Origin: Japan

Temperament: Alert, happy, stubborn, confident, loving, and smart.

Weight: 15 – 24 Pounds

Coat Type: Double coat, dense, shedding.

Lifespan: 12 – 15 Years

Common Health Issues: Hip dysplasia, eye issues, allergies, and patellar luxation.

Pros: 

  • Shiba Inus are moderately sized dogs while still being sturdy
  • They are energetic and playful
  • They are smart and can learn quickly

Cons: 

  • Shiba Inus can be prone to destructive behavior if bored or under exercised
  • They have a very high prey drive
  • Shiba Inus are good little escape artists
  • They can be aggressive towards other pets
  • They must be socialized and trained at an early age or they will be fearful of other people
  • Shiba Inus are heavy shedders

Let’s Learn More About the Shiba Inu!

While the Shiba Inu may resemble the Akita on some levels, this foxy, wolf-like dog breed is actually smaller and more compact.

The Shiba Inu has a thick, soft, double-layer coat that sheds heavily. He is intelligent and can learn quickly, although he can have a stubborn streak. The Shiba Inu is also known to have a high prey drive and isn’t recommended for homes with cats or smaller pets like birds or rodents.

Is A Wolf Like Dog Breed Right For Me?


Deciding if a wolf like dog breed is right for you will depend on your unique lifestyle. 

As we mentioned early on, not every dog is right for every person, and this is especially true when one is considering a dog who may be work-oriented, high-energy, or have a high prey drive.

Many of the dogs on the list above made it to the list above because of their commonality with wild wolves. They are not only beautiful, majestic, and ethereal looking creatures but they are also intelligent, hard working, and highly energetic.

Smart dogs with working backgrounds need extra time and attention, which often comes as a surprise to novice dog owners, who may assume that intelligent dogs are actually easier to train.

The truth is, smart, work-oriented dog breeds can sometimes be more stubborn than other canines, exhibit aloof behaviors and serious stubborn streaks. Intelligent dogs also tend to suffer more often from anxiety due to stress or depression if they are not adequately kept stimulated both mentally and physically.

Many of the wolf like dog breeds on this list require a certain amount of daily exercise each and every day and lots of mental stimulation to help keep them on their toes and mentally happy.

To help avoid your wolf like dog breed from engaging in destructive behaviour, we suggest dog proofing your home and investing in some doggy brain games like puzzle toys. You can also work with your dog by doing mental exercises and by consistently training him and teaching him new tricks.

You should also keep in mind that wolf like dog breeds tend to have thick, double-layered coats that shed heavily, especially twice a year during shedding season.

With that being said, wolf like dogs would probably not be the best choice for those who suffer from allergies.

Larger dogs like many of these wolf like dogs listed above can also be costlier than other dogs who don’t eat as much or require as much grooming or have as many health issues. This is why the overall price of caring for one of the breeds above is something to consider when considering a wolf like dog breed or a wolf hybrid.

Aside from all that, most experts agree that, so long as your dog is well socialized, consistently trained, supervised around young children, and kept mentally and physically stimulated, there is no reason one of the above dogs couldn’t make a fabulous addition to the right home.

The most important thing you can do to ensure you get the right dog for you is to do plenty of research before deciding to commit to the dog breed or mix.

Make sure your lifestyle and home type are good fits for whatever dog you are interested in and that you are able and willing to offer that dog the right amount of exercise, mental stimulation, training, socialization, and more based on his unique needs so that he can remain a happy and healthy member of your family.

Would you ever consider getting a wolf hybrid, or would you prefer to stick with wolf like dogs like many of the ones listed above?

Tell us your opinion in the comment section below!