12 Poodle Mixes That Make Great Family Dogs

Are you considering inviting a furry new friend into your family? If you’re reading this article, chances are the answer to that question is yes! 

If you’re a family with kiddos, you’re probably taking extra time thinking about what kind of dog would fit in best with your brood, and it would be no surprise if you’ve already had your eye on a Poodle mix.

Poodle mixes, or Doodle dogs, as they are often referred to, are rising rapidly in popularity and it’s easy to see why.

Purebred Poodles have a number of wonderful traits. They are known for their incredible intelligence and for being family friendly. They are also great companions to those who suffer from allergies as Poodles are considered to be hypoallergenic. 

It’s no wonder you might be considering getting a Poodle mix for your family. But before you decide on the type of Poodle mix you want, there are a few basic traits most experts agree you should look for in a family dog, regardless of the breed.

Let’s learn more. 

What Traits Should I Look For In A Family Dog?


Finding the perfect dog for your family may take time.

For most people, looking for a family dog means looking for a dog that will be friendly, family oriented, and a dog that will get along well with children and sometimes other household pets. 

Many studies have shown that there are plenty of benefits to growing up with a dog in the home, but that doesn’t mean every dog is right for every family.

Remember that smaller dog breeds may not be right for families with younger children, as small dogs can be more prone to injury if handled too roughly. Small dogs may also be prone to snapping and nipping if they are fearful or picked up by youngsters the wrong way. 

Larger dogs should be supervised around small children and, of course, all dogs should be properly socialized and trained at an early age. 

Experts highly encourage parents to educate their children on how to properly handle and interact with a dog. It’s important that all members of the family treat their furry companion with kindness and respect, and that children are taught how to properly touch, pet, and handle a dog. 

And remember, before introducing a dog into your home, experts suggest doing plenty of research on different breeds, focusing on their temperament, health, and overall personality traits to ensure you pick the right dog for your home and lifestyle.

But what if you are looking at a crossbreed like a Doodle mix? How will you be able to hone in on matters like health issues, temperament, and more? 

Well, that’s part of the controversy of crossbreeding. Keep reading!

What Is A Crossbreed And Why Is Crossbreeding Controversial?


Even though crossbreeding has been going on for centuries, it is still a controversial practice. 

Crossbreeding has been around for centuries and is, in fact, how most of the purebreds we know and love today came to be. 

The practice of crossbreeding began as a way for breeders to perfect certain traits in dogs. For example, many hunting dogs were crossbred carefully to hone in on scent, speed, and agility. 

Herding dogs were crossbred to enhance traits like independence, intelligence, and work ethic. 

Of course, it takes generations for a crossbreed to successfully be considered a purebred dog in its own right, which is where the controversy of modern-day crossbreeding comes into play. 

The Labradoodle, Goldendoodle, or any doodle hybrid of today is considered to be a crossbreed when it is a mix between two purebred parents.

Crossbreeds differ from mutts because they have two very distinct bloodlines, while mutts may be mixes of several different dogs. 

While many people in the dog world feel that there is nothing wrong with crossbreeding and that mixed breed dogs are, in many cases, healthier than purebreds, others disagree. 

They argue that crossbreeding leads to unpredictable personality traits and health issues, and that breeders are being irresponsible for selling what are often called “designer dogs” under the guise that they have been as diligently and carefully bred as their purebred counterparts.

So, what’s the truth? 

The lines are still a bit blurry when it comes to who is right and who is wrong on the issue of crossbreeding, and there are experts who bring up valid points on both sides of the argument. 

The good news is that most dogs, regardless of if they are crossbreeds, purebreeds, or mutts, can be happy and healthy dogs so long as they are well socialized, health screened, and consistently trained using positive reinforcement methods.

With that in mind, let’s talk Doodle dogs! Here are 12 Poodle mixes that make great family dogs!

1. The Labradoodle


The Labradoodle is a rising star in the hybrid dog world.

A Cross Between: A Labrador Retriever and A Standard Poodle

Average Weight: 50 – 65 Pounds

Average Temperamental Traits: Intelligent, outgoing, family-friendly, athletic, and happy.

Average Lifespan: 15 Years

Common Health Issues: Hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, von Willebrand’s disease, and progressive retinal atrophy.

Pros: Labradoodles are happy companions who get along well with children of all ages. They are active and outgoing, and a friend to everyone they meet. 

Cons: If not properly trained and socialized at an early age, Labradoodles can be anxious and easily overstimulated. They need lots of exercise and mental stimulation to keep from becoming bored and destructive. 

Let’s Learn More About the Labradoodle!

Labradoodles are both adorable and intelligent! A mix between two of the world’s most popular dog breeds, the Labrdoodle originally came about as a way to offer service dog assistance while also being hypoallergenic. 

These pups are highly active, however, and require consistent training and loads of exercise or they can be prone to boredom and destructive behaviors. 

Labradoodles are best suited for active families who are able to spend lots of time with their dog and enjoy hiking, camping, and other outdoor adventures together. 

2. The Maltipoo


Because of their small size, Maltipoos make for great dogs for families with older children. 

A Cross Between: A Maltese and a Teacup or Toy Poodle

Average Weight: 5 – 20 Pounds

Average Temperamental Traits: Intelligent, friendly, outgoing, gentle, and affectionate. 

Average Lifespan: 13 Years

Common Health Issues: Epilepsy, patellar luxation, white shaker syndrome, Legg Calve Perthes disease, Portosystemic shunt, retinal atrophy, oral issues, colitis, tracheal collapse, and hypoglycemia. 

Pros: Maltipoos are trainable companion dogs who enjoy being with their families and are eager to please. They are a cross between two hypoallergenic breeds and make an ideal companion for those suffering from allergies. 

Cons: The Maltipoo is bred for companionship and can suffer from separation anxiety which can lead to depression, stress, and destructive behaviors if left alone for too long. 

Let’s Learn More About the Maltipoo!

The little Maltipoo is a family favorite for its friendly demeanor and gentle, loving nature. This playful pup knows how to have fun while also being very mild-mannered and go-with-the-flow. 

Smaller than some doodle mixes on this list, the Maltipoo requires only moderate exercise and is a low maintenance companion for families looking for a dog who is easy to care for and even easier to adore.

However, the Maltipoo can be prone to injury if handled too roughly by very young children and should be supervised around children as well as socialized and trained at an early age.

3. The Goldendoodle


Goldendoodles have lots of energy and need consistent mental and physical stimulation. 

A Cross Between: A Golden Retriever and A Standard Poodle

Average Weight: 30 – 45 Pounds

Average Temperamental Traits: Highly intelligent, energetic, social, and athletic. 

Average Lifespan: 10 – 15 Years

Common Health Issues: Sebaceous adenitis, subvalvular aortic stenosis, hip dysplasia, Addison’s disease, progressive retinal atrophy, glaucoma, and cataracts. 

Pros: Goldendoodle dogs are considered to be some of the smartest dogs in the world, according to the Goldendoodle Association of North America. They are eager to please and easy to train and get along well with both children and other pets. 

Cons: The Goldendoodle can be prone to anxiety due to his high level of intelligence and needs consistent training and mental stimulation throughout his lifetime. He will also need consistent grooming. 

Let’s Learn More About the Goldendoodle!

Similar to the Labradoodle, the Goldendoodle is another popular and highly sought after doodle mix in the United States. 

Highly intelligent and family oriented, the Goldendoodle makes a great companion for very active and outgoing families.

However, if not properly trained and socialized at an early age, the Goldendoodle can be prone to suffering anxiety and have some social setbacks. 

This is a crossbreed who needs lots of attention, exercise, training, and mental stimulation to stay happy and healthy. 

4. The Cockapoo


Cockapoos are intelligent and friendly family dogs.

A Cross Between: A Cocker Spaniel and A Toy Poodle

Average Weight: 12 – 24 Pounds

Average Temperamental Traits: Playful, clever, active, and eager to please. 

Average Lifespan: 14 – 18 Years

Common Health Issues: Patellar luxation, disc disease, cataracts, glaucoma, ear infections, progressive retinal atrophy, hip dysplasia, phosphofructokinase deficiency, and otitis.

Pros: Cockapoos are one of the oldest “designer dogs” meaning they are more predictable than some when it comes to health concerns and temperamental traits. They make for loyal, playful companions and are great for families with children.

Cons: Cockapoo dogs can have a high prey drive and are not ideal dogs for homes with smaller pets like rodents or birds. Cockapoos can also be vocal and can require consistent grooming. 

Let’s Learn More About the Cockapoo!

Cockapoos are known for both their adorable, affectionate nature as well as their incredible intelligence!

This mixed breed gets brains from both sides of the family tree, making him eager to please and easy to train.

However, the cockapoo may not be as hypoallergenic as some Poodle mixes on this list and is also known to be a small dog with a big bark. He likes to use his voice and may have a high prey drive so homes with smaller pets like guinea pigs or birds should be cautious.  

5. The Bernedoodle


The Bernadoodle is a sweet puppy who grows into a very big and sweet dog! 

A Cross Between: Bernese Mountain Dog and Standard Poodle

Average Weight: 70 – 90 Pounds

Average Temperamental Traits: Affectionate, playful, family-oriented.

Average Lifespan: 12 – 15 Years

Common Health Issues: Hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, allergies, cancer, and bone and joint issues. 

Pros: The Bernedoodle is known for being affectionate and playful. He is a big teddy bear with his family and gets along well with children. 

Cons: This is a breed who can be aloof with strangers and needs early socialization and consistent training to stay happy and well-rounded. The Bernadoodle may also require constant upkeep as far as grooming and may shed more than other dogs on this list.

Let’s Learn More About the Bernedoodle!

The Bernedoodle is a cross between two very affectionate and loving purebreds. This is a family-oriented pup who becomes very attached to his people and will not do well left to his own devices for too long.

When properly trained and socialized, the Bernedoodle makes for a wonderful family companion and gets along well with both children and other household pets. 

6. The Schnoodle


Scnoodles are a cross between two active and intelligent pups.

A Cross Between: A Miniature Schnauzer and Toy Poodle

Average Weight: 7 – 16 Pounds

Average Temperamental Traits: Affectionate, intelligent, loyal, and sometimes stubborn.

Average Lifespan: 10 – 16 Years

Common Health Issues: Hip dysplasia, eye issues including progressive retinal atrophy, and luxating patellas. 

Pros: Schnoodles are highly intelligent dogs who get along well with families with older children. 

Cons: The Schnoodle hybrid has been known to be stubborn and can be difficult to train. They are also vocal dogs who may bark excessively and may have a high prey drive.  

Let’s Learn More About the Schnoodle!

Schnoodle dogs are fun and fun loving companions who make wonderful additions to homes with older kiddos who are ready to play! 

The Schnoodle is a loving and intelligent dog who can be prone to hard-headed behaviors but should respond well to positive reinforcement training methods

He is an active companion who needs plenty of exercise and mental stimulation each day and is best suited for families who are active and love spending time outdoors.  

7. The Shih-Poo


Shih Poos are ideal companions for families with older kiddos.

A Cross Between: A Shih Tzu and A Teacup Poodle Or Toy Poodle

Average Weight: 8 – 16 Pounds

Average Temperamental Traits: Clever, quiet, affectionate, and attentive. 

Average Lifespan: 10 – 18 Years

Common Health Issues: Luxating patella, entropion, progressive retinal atrophy, cataracts, and hip dysplasia. 

Pros: Shih-Poo dogs require moderate exercise and are adaptable to many different household types. They get along well with both children and other dogs. 

Cons: The Shih-Poo is family oriented and can suffer from depression and separation anxiety when left home alone. 

Let’s Learn More About the Shih Poo!

Shih-Poos are wonderful additions to any family or household, but they do especially well with families who have older, more gentle children due to their smaller size. 

This is a mixed breed who gets along well with most everyone, including other household pets. He is eager to please, easy to train, and needs only mild to moderate exercise.

He is the perfect dog for apartment living and would love nothing more than just lounging around inside or sleeping near you or on your lap. 

8. The Whoodle


The Whoodle makes for a loving and gentle companion. 

A Cross Between: A Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier and A Poodle

Average Weight: 20 – 45 Pounds

Average Temperamental Traits: Friendly, funny, outgoing, and intelligent.

Average Lifespan: 12 – 15 years

Common Health Issues: Ear infections, hip dysplasia, progressive retinal atrophy, and allergies. 

Pros: Whoodles are quiet, active companions who get along with both children and other household pets. They are loving and enjoy being with their family. 

Cons: Whoodle dogs need lots of exercise and mental stimulation to keep from being bored. They can also be puppy-like throughout their whole life, which can be a bit much for more low key families looking for a mild mannered pup. 

Let’s Learn More About the Whoodle!

A cross between two very athletic breeds, the Whoodle is an active, outgoing, friendly, and funny pooch who is going to keep everyone on their toes and laughing. 

Whoodles are intelligent and eager to please, making them easy to train and fun to be around. And while they get along well with both children and other household pets, Whoodles are known for being active and puppy-like and will be best suited for active households with lots going on to keep them busy, occupied, and happy. 

9. The Aussiedoodle


Aussiedoodles are a cross between two of the dog worlds most clever breeds. 

A Cross Between: An Australian Shepherd and a Standard Poodle

Average Weight:  25 – 70 Pounds

Average Temperamental Traits: Loyal, family-oriented, intelligent, active. 

Average Lifespan: 10 – 12 Years

Common Health Issues: Progressive retinal atrophy, hip dysplasia, cataracts, autoimmune thyroiditis, and sebaceous adenitis. 

Pros: The Aussiedoodle is highly intelligent and very loyal to his family. He is loving and affectionate and builds a very strong bond with his people. 

Cons: The Aussiedoodle can be prone to herding instincts and can suffer from separation anxiety and stress if left alone too long. He needs lots of attention, training, exercise and mental stimulation to stay happy. Aussiedoodles can also be stubborn. 

Let’s Learn More About the Aussiedoodle!

Aussiedoodles are incredibly family oriented and will become very attached to their people. They are great for families with older children and families who are able to be around and home often.

This is a mixed breed who needs plenty of exercise and mental stimulation and should be socialized and trained at an early age to help keep him from suffering from anxiety. 

10. The Bossi-Poo


Because of his Terrier side, the Bossi Poo may be bossy, like his name suggests. 

A Cross Between: A Boston Terrier and A Toy Poodle

Average Weight: 25 – 50 Pounds 

Average Temperamental Traits: Loyal, clever, loving, and sometimes stubborn. 

Average Lifespan: 12 – 15 Years

Common Health Issues: Addison’s Disease, Patellar luxation, cataracts, bloat, and progressive retinal atrophy. 

Pros: Bossi Poo dogs are affectionate and get along well with children and other pets. They are eager to please and easy to train. 

Cons: Bossi Poo dogs are known to suffer from separation anxiety that can lead to destructive behaviors, depression, and stress. 

Let’s Learn More About the Bossi Poo!

The Bossi Poo is a cross between two active and outgoing breeds who are known for their clever minds and funny personalities.

With that being said, it’s safe to say that the Bossi Poo will be the family comedian and will enjoy learning new tricks and showing off for his admirers

While this is a great dog for families of all ages, he would do best in homes where members of the family are around often since this hybrid doodle dog has been known to suffer from separation anxiety

11. The Westie-Poo


Westie Poos are clever and funny dogs.

A Cross Between: A West Highland White Terrier and A Toy Poodle

Average Weight: 30 – 40 Pounds 

Average Temperamental Traits: Energetic, affectionate, active, and independent. 

Average Lifespan: 12 – 15 Years

Common Health Issues: Progressive retinal atrophy, epilepsy, liver disease, chronic skin issues, dental problems, and obesity. 

Pros: Westie-Poos are energetic, fun-loving dogs who are affectionate and great for families of all ages. They love their people and enjoy new adventures. 

Cons: Westie-Poos may be somewhat independent and can be stubborn. They require plenty of exercise and mental stimulation to keep them from becoming bored and destructive when left to their own devices. 

Let’s Learn More About the Westie-Poo!

The Westie-Poo is an adorable and affectionate pup who is great for families who love being outdoors and going on adventures.

This clever little hybrid is both loving and independant, making him a great mix for families on the go. However, the Westie-Poo can be prone to destructive behaviors if he isn’t kept mentally stimulated and isn’t properly exercised.  

12. The Bordoodle


The adorable Bordoodle is sure to steal your heart.

A Cross Between: A Border Collie and A Standard Poodle

Average Weight: 30 – 60 Pounds

Average Temperamental Traits: Friendly, intelligent, outgoing, and gentle.

Average Lifespan: 12 – 15 Years

Common Health Issues: Hip dysplasia, allergies, epilepsy, and progressive retinal atrophy. 

Pros: The Bordoodle gets along famously with everyone, from household pets to children to seniors. He is playful, friendly, eager to please and easy to train. This hybrid is also good at entertaining himself when home alone

Cons: Bordoodles may need more maintenance when it comes to grooming and may have herding instincts and a high play drive. 

Let’s Learn More About the Bordoodle!

Also known as the Borpoo, Borderpoo, or Border Poodle, the Bordoodle crossbreed is an excellent addition to nearly any family.

He makes for a wonderful and adaptive companion who, with the right amount of exercise and mental stimulation, can get along well in many different types of households.

Bordoodles are great with children and make excellent playmates, but they also know when to relax and entertain themselves.

They are eager to please and easy to train, and know how to be calm, making them good additions to households with seniors as well.

Choosing The Right Puppy Or Rescue Dog For You


Picking the right puppy or rescue dog for your family takes time and research. 

Picking out your new puppy or rescue dog is an exciting endeavor that the whole family should be a part of. 

It’s important for bonding to make sure all members of the immediate family get along with your new addition and are able to take part in helping to name, train, and raise their furry friend. 

To ensure you and your family end up with the healthiest puppy or rescue dog possible, make sure you are going through the proper resources.

When looking for a puppy, beware of backyard breeders, pet stores, and online sellers. Stick with reputable breeders who are able to offer you certificates of health screening and will make sure your puppy is old enough to go home with you. 

And while you may not think finding the doodle of your dreams will be easy when going through a rescue, the truth is that there are many breed-specific organizations that specialize in certain breeds and mixed breeds. 

If you want to follow the adopt don’t shop motto but worry you won’t get the dog you are looking for, just do a bit of research and you may be surprised!

One of the many benefits of rescuing a dog, aside from offering a dog in need a good home, is that rescuing a dog typically costs much less than purchasing a dog from a breeder. Furthermore, many rescue dogs may already be housetrained and will have likely been screened for health and behavioral issues. 

Which doodle mix on the list is tugging at your heartstrings? Let us know in the comment section below!

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