Native American Indian Dog Breed Information – 10 Things to Know

Difficult to come by and with a wild, wolf-like appearance, the Native American Indian Dog is a sight to behold. This beautiful breed has an incredible history, and his unique story combined with his desirable temperament make this dog a canine treasure.

But there is a reason you likely haven’t come across many Native American Indian Dogs in your region or neighborhood.

So, what is it about the Native American Indian Dog that makes him so unique? That’s what we’re here to discover. Join us today as we cover 10 things you should know about the Native American Indian Dog.

But before we get started, let’s first take a look at the Native American Indian Dog’s breed overview.

Keep reading.

The Native American Indian Dog – A Breed Overview

1 a Native American Indian dog looking at the camera
Native American Indian Dogs closely resemble wolves, though they do not have wolf DNA.

Size: 23 – 34 Inches

Weight: 55 – 120 Pounds

Temperament: Devoted, Intelligent, Alert, Work-Oriented

Health Issues: Hip Dysplasia and Other Joint Issues, Age-Induced Arthritis

Lifespan: 14 – 19 Years

Coat Colors: Black, Silver, Grey, Fawn, and Tortoiseshell (Considered a Sacred Color to Native Americans)

Coat Type: Dense, Double Coated and Either Short or Long

Hypoallergenic: Yes

Clubs That Recognize the Native American Indian Dog:

  • The Native American Indian Dog Registry
  • The Dog Registry of America
  • And The National Kelle Club

1. The Native American Indian Dog’s Origin Is A Fascinating Mystery

3 a white Native American Indian Dog
The origin of Native American Indian Dogs is riddled in debate.

The Native American Indian Dog, sometimes referred to as the NAID, does closely resemble a wolf, although anyone who tries to tell you this dog is a wolf hybrid is either misinformed or being untruthful.

The reality is that Native American Indian Dogs are not as wild as they appear to be, with modern day Native American Indian Dogs having a number of domesticated breeds in their DNA like Alaskan Malamutes, Siberian Huskies, and other wolf-lookalikes.

Of course, these modern day Native American Indian Dogs are not actually the true Native American Indian Dogs of old.

The original Native American Indian Dog, sometimes known as the Common Indian Dog or Common Native Dog, is what many experts correlate as the “missing link” of the first ever domesticated dog breeds that existed nearly 12,000 years ago.

It is believed that the ancestors of Native American Indian Dogs were brought to North America by migrating travelers and foreign traders, who traded these dogs to Native Americans during the early 1700’s.

Native Americans then perfected these dogs based on their needs, often cross breeding them with North American Coyotes. This contributed to the Native American Indian Dog’s wild look, and helped ensure the dog was a resilient, work-oriented companion to Native Americans.

Even then, the Native American Indian Dog was not solely considered one breed. He continued to be bred and mixed with other dogs as generations went, helping ensure his temperament and appearance over time.

Throughout his history, the Native American Indian Dog made a name for himself as an intelligent, hard-working and devoted companion.

This is perhaps why a Native American Indian Dog breed enthusiast by the name of Karen Markel went to work to recreate the Native American Indian Dog of old during the 1990’s.

Using historical documentation, Mrs. Markel worked to perfect the Native American Indian Dog and to hone in on the traits that made this canine so valuable throughout history.

Thanks to Mrs. Markel and her team of devoted breeders at Majestic View Kennels, what we have today is a modern-day wild-looking dog who is known for his intelligence, work ethic, devotion to family and versatility.

2. Native American Indian Dogs Are Not Considered Purebred

2 an old photo of native american indian dogs
Because Native American Indian dogs are hybrids, they are not accepted by the American Kennel Club.

Neither the original Native American Indian Dogs of the 1700’s nor the modern Native American Indian Dogs we know and love today are considered purebred. This is because their pedigree was less important to old breeders when compared to their overall vigor and work ethic.

Originally designed as hunting dogs, guard dogs and companion dogs, the Native American Indian dog is a canine with several different breeds in his DNA.

So, what makes up a modern-day Native American Indian Dog? According to experts, the Native American Indian Dog is a mix between:

Because the Native American Indian Dog is a relatively new dog to the scene and because his breeding and perfecting is still ongoing, he has yet to be accepted by most major breed clubs like the American Kennel Club.

That said, there are plenty of other clubs that recognize this stunning dog, and they may be able to help point you towards resources when looking to find a good breeder, trainer, or other NAID experts who are passionate about this incredible canine.

3. The Native American Indian Dog Comes In Two Sizes and Coat Types

4 three Native American Indian Dogs
Though they have dense coats, Native American Indian Dogs can be hypoallergenic.

Although the size of the Native American Dog can vary, there are two common size varieties the breed is available in.

Some Native American Indian Dogs are small to medium sized, standing only 23 inches tall and weighing less than 55 pounds.

The other size variety is vastly different, with Native American Indian Dogs growing to massive heights of up to 34 inches and weighing sometimes over 120 pounds.

There are also two coat types owners can consider, with one coat being long and dense while the other is short and rough.

Regardless of which coat type you opt for, both are considered hypoallergenic.

Yes, you read that correctly – the Native American Indian Dog is considered to have a hypoallergenic coat. This is an incredible feat when you consider the fact that Native American Indian Dogs are a mix of shedding dogs like Huskies and German Shepherds, amongst others.

Yet, somehow the Native American Indian Dog maintains his dense, double-coat without being a serious shedder and without producing as much dander in his fur as many of his other canine counterparts.

This is great news for those who suffer from allergies but are still interested in raising a Native American Indian Dog.

4. Native American Indian Dogs Are Highly Intelligent Working Breeds

5 two native american indian dogs in the snow
Native American Indian Dogs have played many roles in their lives, from service dogs to hunting dogs.

Native American Indian Dogs are highly intelligent, which shouldn’t come as a surprise considering the breeds they have in their DNA.

German Shepherds, Huskies, Chinooks and Alaskan Malamutes are all bred working dogs, so the Native American Indian Dog is surely going to maintain many of these qualities. Furthermore, the Native American Indian Dog is also highly energetic.

This is a breed who needs plenty of mental stimulation and exercise to ensure he is happy, healthy and well-rounded.

A Native American Indian Dog who is left without proper mental or physical stimulation can become a major problem for their owner, with many becoming destructive, anxious and even aggressive.

To ensure your Native American indian Dog is happy and mentally sound, experts recommend utilizing consistent training throughout your dog’s lifetime. Giving your Native American Indian Dog a job to do around the house can also help keep him focused and feeling valuable.

We also recommend investing in quality training toys for your Native American Indian Dog like puzzle toys and interactive toys to help keep them engaged and happy during the day.

Nina Ottosson Puzzle Toy For Dogs

The Nina Ottosson Puzzle Toy is one of our favorite puzzle toys for intelligent dogs like the Native American Indian Dog for a number of reasons. Frist, this toy is not painted with any harmful paints that could contain toxic chemicals, making it safe for dogs to chew on.

It also is built to hold and hide treats or kibble, which can help keep your Native American Indian Dog’s attention and challenge him, which is what intelligent dogs like the NAID need to stay mentally happy and healthy.

If you don’t like this toy or would like a more challenging toy, the same company offers other puzzle toys at different levels for your dog’s unique abilities. This particular puzzle toy above is listed at an advanced Level 3.

5. These Dogs Do Best With Experienced Dog Owners

6 an Indian dog laying down
The Native American Indian Dog is clever and athletic, but he needs an experienced owner.

The Native American Indian Dog is a bred working dog. He also has the potential to be a very large, high energy dog and can be overwhelming for novice dog owners. The best dog owner for a Native American Indian Dog is going to be an owner who is experienced with large working breeds that are highly intelligent.

Many dog lovers assume that Intelligent dogs will be easier to train and work with, but the truth is that really brainy breeds can actually be more complicated to work with.

This is because smarter dogs have the potential to become stubborn and easily distracted or bored. Smarter dogs like the Native American Indian Dogs can also be prone to suffering from anxiety and depression if their mental and physical stimulation needs are not met.

For this reason, these dogs are best suited for homes with large, securely fenced backyards or for those who live in rural areas or on farms.

But while these dogs do enjoy being outside, they are made to live indoors with their human families. They are highly devoted and loving and may suffer from destructive behaviors if left to their own devices for too long.

6. NAIDs Require Routine Exercise, Training and Socialization

7 a native american indian dog on a leash
Investing in the proper walking equipment can help ensure your Native American Indian Dog performs his best during walks and outings.

Being a bit more high maintenance, Native American Indian Dogs require plenty of routine exercise, training and socialization.

How To Exercise A Native American Indian Dog

Experts recommend at least 60 minutes or more of daily exercise for the Native American Indian Dog, if not more. They will likely need to get outside multiple times a day and have free play or run time in a large, securely fenced backyard.

Long walks, jogs, runs or hikes can help you meet your Native American Indian Dog’s needs, as will trips to the dog park and games of fetch, frisbee or chase in a large yard.

When you are walking your Native American Indian Dog, be sure to walk him on the proper equipment like a no pull dog walking leash and harness. Refrain from using choke chains or prong collars and instead stick with front clip harnesses that reduce pulling and redirect your dog back to you.

One of our favorite harnesses for large breed dogs like the Native American Indian Dog is the PetSafe 3 In 1 No Pull Harness listed below.

PetSafe 3 in 1 Dog Walking Harness

This harness provides you with a front and back clip option for better control of your dog during walks. This option also redirects your NAID back to you if he should pull. The harness comes in several different sizes, which is ideal for a dog who comes in two size varieties like the Native American Indian Dog.

You can also get this harness in different colors to fit you and your dog’s personality.

Tips On Training A Native American Indian Dog

Training a Native American Indian Dog can be a fun and relationship-building experience so long as you use positive reinforcement techniques. Native American Indian Dogs become very bonded with their people and will do well with an owner who is consistent, patient and who understands working breeds.

This is also a breed who responds best to positive reinforcement techniques like treats and praise and an owner who challenges him and allows him to think. However, keep in mind that the Native American Indian Dog is an independent, free-thinking dog who may become stubborn and distracted if training is not kept exciting enough.

How To Properly Socialize A Native American Indian Dog

All dogs require routine socialization beginning at an early age. Socialization not only helps reduce behavioral issues due to anxiety, but it can also increase your dog’s ability to focus on you during training sessions and reduce the chance of your dog becoming distracted.

Large, highly intelligent dogs like the Native American Indian Dog especially require routine socialization beginning in puppyhood in order to grow up happy, healthy and well-rounded. In order to properly socialize your Native American Indian Dog, it’s important to bring him with you as often as possible and introduce him to as many new experiences as you can while he is a puppy.

Also try to be sure that your Native American Indian Dog is used to being handled on sensitive areas of his body like his paws, ears, tail and nose.

Remember, Native American Indian Dogs come from a hunting background and are likely to have a strong prey drive. They are also descendants of working breeds like German Shepherds and Huskies. All of this should be taken into account when socializatin a Native American Indian Dog, as they will need consistency, patience, and routine work throughout their lives.

7. Native American Indian Dogs Can Get Along Well With Children and Other pets

8 two native american indian dogs against black
These dogs are social and friendly, though they still require monitoring around young children.

When properly trained and socialized, the Native American Indian Dog has the potential to make a wonderful dog for families. They are social dogs who can get along well with other dogs in the home, though they may not be best suited for those with cats or other smaller animals. Remember, the Native American Indian Dog has hunting genes and a high prey drive, and he may therefore see smaller pets as prey or be tempted to chase them.

When it comes to children, the Native American Indian Dog is a gentle and patient companion. He may not be as playful or rambunctious as a Golden Retriever or Labrador, but the Husky in him will likely provide him with enough energy to enjoy youngsters and want to be around them.

Even then, we recommend teaching young children basic canine body language. Help your child understand the respectful and kind ways to interact with your Native American Indian Dog, and avoid allowing children to roughhouse or wrestle, as this could encourage aggressive behaviors and dogs or children could become injured.

It’s also best to monitor very young, toddler aged children around your Native American Indian Dog. Regardless of how patient or loving any dog is, they will not enjoy being poked, pulled on, prodded or sat on.

To reduce the chances of a nip or bite, keep an eye on toddlers and Native American Indian Dogs until the child is old enough to understand how to respectfully interact with their dog on their own.

Investing in a puppy playpen or dog gate can help keep everyone safe when parents are busy.

Cumbor Auto Close Safety Gate

The above safety gate is ideal for those with dogs and young children in the home. It is easy to install and doesn’t require any equipment, nor will it damage your walls. This gate is also adjustable to fit most doorways and it opens and closes easily to allow access to adults while making it difficult if not impossible for children or pets to get past.

The gate is also affordable and available in different colors to match your decor. For best results with this protective gate, be sure you read the instructions carefully before use.

8. The Native American Indian Dog Can Live For Up To 19 Years

9 a brown Native american wolf dog
Like all dogs, the Native American Indian Dog can be prone to some health issues owners should be aware of.

If you’re looking for a healthy, long-lived dog, look no further than the Native American Indian Dog. In fact, one of his best qualities outside of his loving and trainable temperament is that he’s a healthy dog who can live for up to 19 years.

This is incredible, considering the Native American Indian Dog’s large size. Of course, there is such a thing as hybrid vigor, which is the idea that mixed breeds like the Native American Indian Dog are inherently healthier than their purebred counterparts due to their wider gene pool.

However, this is still up for debate and there are potentially serious health issues you should be aware of when choosing to invest in a Native American Indian Dog.

These health issues include but are not limited to:

  • Hip Dysplasia and Other Joint Issues
  • Age-Induced Arthritis

Yes, that’s right. The only major health issues we can find on the Native American Indian Dog is joint issues like hip dysplasia and age-induced arthritis.

This is not surprising, considering this dog’s large size, but the truth is these dogs are famous for their incredible health and long lifespan.

The good news is that there are some ways you can go about ensuring you raise the healthiest Native American Indian Dog possible.

Buy Your NAID From A Reputable Breeder

First and foremost, be sure you get your Native American Indian Dog from a reputable source. For many people, this means going through a breeder who has a history with the breed and who understands the importance of responsible breeding practices.

Be wary of breeders who are unqualified or who cannot provide you with paperwork or certificates of health, and avoid breeders who insist that a NIAD is a wolf-dog hybrid or who attempts to sell you the NAID at a much higher or lower price than average.

Remember, the Native American Indian Dog is not a wolf hybrid, and breeders who tell you otherwise likely do not have an educated background in the true breed standard.

Keep Up With Routine Grooming

While the Native American Indian Dog is considered hypoallergenic, he still has a dense, double coat that sheds slightly. This coat will require routine brushing and grooming with quality tools to help reduce potential mats, tangles, and skin issues.

Along with brushing, your Native American Indian Dog will also require occasional bathing. The good news is that this dog has a weather resistant, self-cleaning coat that only requires a bath every couple of months.

Refrain from over-bathing your Native American Indian Dog, as this can lead to exasperated skin and coat issues.

Like all dogs, the Native American Indian Dog should have his ears checked and cleaned regularly to keep them free of debris and buildup. His nails should be trimmed often to keep them from breaking during play or exercise and his teeth should be brushed once a day using a dog-safe toothbrush and toothpaste.

Keep Up With Regular Vet Visits

Keeping up with routine vet visits not only helps prevent potential health issues in your Native American Indian Dog but it can also help catch any issues ahead of time and prevent them from becoming more serious and costly.

Most veterinarians recommend that the Native American Indian Dog be seen at least once a year up until he is seven, and then twice a year from seven on.

Also be sure to have your Native American Indian Dog routinely vaccinated and be sure not to neglect routine parasite prevention medications as well as other preventative methods available to you.

Keep Your NAID On A Quality Diet

Last but not least, be sure you keep your Native American Indian Dog on a quality dog food. Avoid feeding him an abundance of human foods or treats, and if you opt to make your own dog food at home, speak with your veterinarian about the nutrients your Native American Indian dog needs in order to thrive.

With that in mind, let’s take a closer look at the type of dog food the Ntaive American Indian Dog does best with.

9. The Native American Indian Dog Needs A Protein Rich Diet In Order To Thrive

10 a black and brown Native American Indian Dog In snow
Because they are so athletic and intelligent, this hybrid requires a quality diet rich in protein and fatty acids.

While it is true that the Native American Indian Dog is a relatively healthy and long-lived mix, it is also true that an unhealthy diet can exasperate or even lead to health issues in the breed. In order to keep your Native American Indian Dog feeling his best, be sure to provide him with a dog food that is specified for his age, weight and activity level.

Remember, the Native American Indian Dog comes in two sizes, so medium sized NIADs should eat dog food for medium-sized breeds and large NIADs should eat dog food for large breed dogs.

Both size NIADs will also require a high-protein diet rich in real animal protein, carbs, fatty acids, vitamins, minerals, and water.

Avoid dog foods or treats that include additives or fillers, byproducts, corn, soy, gluten or wheat, and speak with your veterinarian about any dietary concerns you have regarding certain brands of dog food.

10. Native American Indian Dog Puppies Can Be Costly

11 Native American Wolf Dog Puppies
Depending on the breeder you go through, a Native American Puppy can cost up to $2,000.

Although the Native American Indian Dog isn’t considered a purebred, his price doesn’t reflect a mix. In fact, NAID puppies average around $1,500 to $2,000 when purchased through reputable breeders.

Of course, it’s important not to try and cut corners when looking for this dog, as you may wind up with a sick puppy, a dog with behavioral issues, or a dog that is not a true Native American Indian Dog at all.

If you do want to get a Native American Indian Dog at a lower cost, you can always consider rescuing a dog through a shetler. While these dogs are relatively rare, there is a chance you could find a shelter in your area that specializes in this dog or mixes like him.

Before you do decide which road to take when obtaining your Native American Indian Dog, it’s vital that you do plenty of research and are prepared for the commitment this type of dog entails.

Of course, you’ve read this article so you’re already on the right track. Keep it up and keep us posted as to whether or not the Native American Indian Dog is right for you.

Best of luck and thanks for reading!

Native American Indian Dog 1 Native American Indian Dog 2