13 Things You Should Know About the Beagle Bull

Sweet, loyal and distinctive looking, a Beagle Bull is a mix between the pitbull terrier and beagle. They can be such sweet and wonderful animals to have in the family.

While not recognized officially as a purebred, its popularity has been growing among breeders. Beagle Bulls can also be found at many rescue organizations due to cross-breeding naturally. They have varying coat colors, personalities and even size. Beagle Bulls can be wonderful, devoted dogs for a family.

The Beagle Bull has only been around for 20 years.

As with many mixed breeds, the origin of the Beagle Bull is unknown exactly. It’s come onto the scene in the last 20 years, most likely due to and accidental breeding. The Dog Registry of America does recognize it as an official mixed breed.

Origins of the Beagle Bulls date back to the 1800s and WWII.

Individually, the beagle and the pitbull terrier breeds both have background of breeding in America and the UK. Within the last century, both were bred as companion and work dogs, beginning in the 1800s. The beagle was bred along the lines of the popular foxhound with not as much speed. Beagles reached their top popularity in the 1950s as house pets. As for pitbull terriers, they came from England in the 1800s. Sadly their original role were bait dogs for bears and hunting, but then became docile companions in the US around World War II.

Beagle Bulls are little guys, smaller than Pitbull Terriers.

On average, Beagle Bulls are 18-20 inches tall. Beagle Bulls live to be about 10-15 years old with proper care. This is mainly due to their medium size and small list of known health issues. With the correct nutritional diet and loving training, Beagle Bulls can live a full life.

They are quick and personable.

This hybrid has a reliable, friendly personality. They are often leaner than pitbulls, and are quite fast.

Their coloring can look like a cow!

Some Beagle Bulls will have distinct pitbull coloring too, such as the cow-like splotches of gray and white. Many are beige with white chests, paws and faces. Their snouts take take on either pitbull or beagle-like traits.

Beagle Bulls are super sharp and clever.

The mix of beagle and pitbull terrier bring interesting traits to this breed. They can be very loyal and snuggly like pitbulls, with a bit of territorial tenancies in home and owners. As for the beagle personality, they are great nose dogs and also get their smaller stature from that side of the mix. They are often very food motivated from the Beagle side too.

Exercise is key to happy Beagle Bulls.

With high energy levels, Beagle Bulls need space to exercise. This can be a large fenced in yard or field/beach with easy access to the home. A few walks a day on leash and some playtime is helpful for keeping their body and minds occupied.

As Beagle Bulls can be susceptible to plaque and tartar buildup, it’s good to have regular teeth cleanings, or at least occasional treats that promote good dental health.

They’ll do anything for a treat.

Beagle Bulls should be fed twice daily. They do well with commercial dog food/kibble, as well as some raw foods to balance out their diet. If training, Beagle Bulls are often very food motivated and require lots of treats. Keep this in mind when considering the amount of twice daily meals. Young Beagle Bulls need a higher fat diet as they grow, so owners can get special food for their first year of life.

Beagle Bulls don’t need much grooming.

Like Labradors and other medium length haired dogs, Beagle Bulls don’t require too much grooming maintenance. They can be brushed regularly to avoid too much shedding, which happens moderately. Skin can dry out, so baths semi-regularly (maybe every 3-4 weeks) is an ideal schedule. They rarely need trims on their coat if at all – just nail trims and ear cleanings.

Puzzles are often Beagle Bulls’ favorite toy.

Beagle Bulls can be a medium to highly active dog. With regular walks and socialization, they grow to be happy and healthy. These dogs do well with lots of fetch games and running, as long as owners are wary of a potential ‘take off’ instinct. With proper training, they can be off leash. Puzzles and tugging games are fun in the house too, as long as your Beagle Bull doesn’t have any aggressive tenancies.

They have a forgetful streak.

Although there is often a stubborn streak, Beagle Bulls are trainable when owners assert dominance. Dogs with alpha tenancies might have to be worked with closely at a young age for obedience. Some people may find tactics like e-collars or professional schooling to be valuable in training this breed of dog.

Beagle Bulls have medium intelligence and can take on many different commands. However, owners will most likely have to continue to remind them or they can forget certain training sessions over time.

Beagle Bulls are healthy dogs.

However, like pitbulls and beagles, this breed mix can fall prey to heart disease. Also like the pitbull, Beagle Bulls not exercised enough may become overweight and will be challenged with health ailments that come with excess pounds. This can include joint problems and fatty livers.

Additional health issues that may occur with this hybrid breed can be:

  •        Tartar and plaque buildup in teeth
  •        Hip dysplasia
  •        Elbow dysplasia
  •        Allergies
  •        Parvo virus

Beagle Bulls are mostly found at rescue organizations.

Most people who own Beagle Bulls have rescued them from a shelter. Those who really would like this particular pet may find some breeders, which are usually rare. Consider the pros and cons between adoption and buying a dog from a breeder.

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