Best Vacuum Cleaners for Dog Hair

This may seem like an unusual topic to be discussing on a dog website.  Believe it or not, though, a shedding dog breed can create a ton of excess hair in your home every day, no matter how frequently you groom them.  Having a hoover that can handle the rigours of cleaning up after your dog can become a big deal.  It is especially important if anyone in the household has allergies or asthma.

There are a lot of vacuums that are just not strong enough to lift those embedded little hairs that get stuck in the carpet and soft furnishings and others that break down when the hairs get stuck in their motor after only a few months of intense use.

So what are the vacuums that come out on top for a hairy dog owner?  Don’t worry, this list is not just going to include the premium, top of the line hoovers that come with a premium price tag.  We will make sure that there are some affordable options too!

The list below is not in any particular order.

Finding a hoover that has a great reputation for its removal of pet hair is so important in a dog owning household 

1. Dyson Ball Animal 2

It wouldn’t be a vacuum review if Dyson didn’t get a mention.  The Dyson Ball Animal 2 is consistently well reviewed in terms of its performance, manoeuvrability and suction.  It is specifically marketed for its effective removal of pet hair and it certainly seems to do this well.  It also has some really useful accessories and a long hose that makes cleaning under furniture, in corners and up stairs very easy.  A lot of customers do note, however, that it has such a powerful suction that it can sometimes require quite a bit of strength to move it swiftly across the carpet.  

It is one of the more pricey models too and whilst there is usually good customer service from Dyson and it is a well known and reputable brand, there are other models on the market at a considerably lower price that also do a good job with pet hair.

2. iRobot Roomba 960

Robotic vacuums are the big recent advancement in the world of vacuum cleaners.  Despite their size, they can actually do a really efficient job but they do often come with a hefty price tag to boot.  Whether you are happy to splurge depends on how much you hate hoovering or how little time you have for the extra task. For pet owners that have multiple dogs or a dog that sheds a lot, they can actually be a really useful investment.  Some big breed dogs that shed a lot can result in you having to hoover more than once a day. With a robotic vacuum, you can just set it to do its job at night after everyone has gone to bed and things are spick and span again when you all get up in the morning.  Their compact size also appeals to those with storage space issues.

The robotic hoovers are often useful for dogs that have vacuum phobias as they are generally a lot quieter than a normal vacuum and they are not big and bulky or being pushed around with force.  There are some dogs that may still need to have gradual introductions and you may not want to leave your dog unsupervised with them initially. It could be costly and potentially dangerous if they are a destructive dog and they decide they are going to try to chew it!

If you have mobility issues or find it difficult to move furniture around to clean under beds or sofas, it is flat enough to fit under a lot of items of furniture too, although it can occasionally get stuck if it is a neat fit.

If you love gadgets, the iRobot Roomba 960 will send you into overdrive. It is one of the most advanced robotic vacuums on the market. It can be set on a timer, turned on and off and even activated through Alexa.  When the battery is running down they even know when to automatically dock so that they can recharge.

A Roomba is not good for stairs though so if you are not all on one level you will need a different hoover or another solution for this.  If you use baby gates or have other obstructions that will stop your Roomba from covering the full floor surface it may be better to opt for a different model.

So, price tag aside, the Roomba is regarded as a great little powerhorse that can save you some work.  

As a dog owner, it is hard not to think about the story that went viral about a dog that had an accident in the house and the Roomba tried to clean it up.  It then proceeded to trial said poop around the entire house over the course of the night and the owners woke up to a very unpleasant surprise the next day!

3. Ecovacs Deebot N79S

If you are keen to get a robotic vacuum cleaner but don’t want to spend so much, then the Ecovacs Deebot N79S comes highly recommended for its price range.  It may be a little noisier than the Roomba and it doesn’t come with as many fancy features but it still gets generally good reviews for its suction power. Some people mention that it also seems to get stuck more easily than the fancier Roomba but when it is so much cheaper it is perhaps a fair compromise?

4. Hoover T-Series WindTunnel Pet Bagged Corded Upright Vacuum UH30310

If you are looking for a really economical upright hoover that is still getting great reviews for its suction capabilities then you may want to consider the Hoover T-Series UH30310.  

It doesn’t look as sleek as some of its more expensive competitors and some users complained that it can be a bit clunky and heavy when manoeuvring and that you have to keep an eye out for the hose getting clogged if it is dealing with heavy amounts of pet hair, but it well reviewed in terms of its suction capability.  Not only does this have an extremely appealing price tag but it does consistently get great reviews for how well it picks up the hairs and so, for hairy dog owners, this is a big plus.

It does use a bag which may not appeal to those looking to be more environmentally friendly.  Some people like the bag as it saves the risk of pet hair and debris flying around and making a mess when you empty it.

So, if you are looking for suction power on a shoestring budget then this may a good choice.

5. BISSELL Crosswave Pet Pro 2306A

If you have regular doggy visitors to your house, particularly puppies that may have accidents it may be worth considering investing in a Wet/Dry Vacuum Cleaner.  Maybe you are a regular doggy fosterer, have a multi-dog household or you home board other people’s dogs. Making sure that you thoroughly clean up any doggy accidents is not only better in terms of hygiene but it also ensures that the dogs are less likely to go back to the same spot again. A lot of wet/dry vacuums do not receive good reviews for their pet hair collection capabilities but the Bissell Crosswave Pet Pro 23606A seems to do well in terms of lifting hair.  It is middle of the range in terms of prices for this type of model too.

A lot of doggy users have mentioned that it is important to regularly clean the filter as this can get quickly clogged with excess dog hairs and this can impact on the performance.

It also comes with a pet cleaning solution which is great for removing any urine odours that can encourage your dog to head back to the same spot.

If you have an adult dog that is continuing to have accidents in the house, it may be time to check in with the vet to rule out any medical problems or go back to basics with the toilet training.

Don’t Forget That Getting Your Dog Used to the Hoover is Important

So, you have your new and effective vacuum but every time you bring it out your dog runs away to the other side of the house and trembles violently until you put it away again?  Or maybe they try to attack it whenever it is turned on?

A lot of dogs really don’t like vacuum cleaners.  The loud noise, the big clunky item rolling around their house, it can all be a little overwhelming, particularly if your dog is generally fearful.

If your dog has an extreme reaction to the hoover then it is always worth trying to get them desensitised to it to save them the stress and to avoid any accidents or damage.

The first thing to do is to get them used to it without it being turned on.  Even just bringing the offending item out of the cupboard can be enough to trigger a nervous reaction in some dogs, some dogs even start to become fearful of the cupboard that the hoover is housed in.  You need to build things up gradually, start by just letting your dog know that good things can happen when you go to that cupboard. Touch the handle of the door and then reward your dog with super tasty treats.  If you repeat this enough they will learn that cupboard does not always just mean scary hoover.  Then you can start to bring the hoover out but just leave it unmoving at the door and reward your dog anytime they look at the hoover.  Next stage will be to look for your dog to move towards the hoover and whenever they do this voluntarily they get a treat. Don’t force it and be patient. You could lay a treat on the floor so that they have to get it (but not close to the hoover at this stage).  The goal is to get them moving closer to the hoover over time so that they realise it is not always scary but actually a good thing.

When they are extremely comfortable with it being close but off, you can then progress to moving it whilst it is still switched off, after this, you can them move to switching it on and then off again but whilst it is stationary and rewarding your dog every time this happens.  

Hopefully by adopting this very gradual approach alongside the use of absolutely delicious treats your dog will learn not to be so uncomfortable around the hoover.

If they continue to be extremely scared it would likely be better to take your dog out the room whenever you are vacuuming it to save them any unnecessary stress.  Don’t force your dog to have to be in the same space if they are uncomfortable and always make sure they have an escape route.

Any dogs are scared of the hoover and will try to hide.  It is important to ensure your dog is given an escape route when it is on and that you spend some time trying to desensitise them if they have an extreme reaction 

The Sneaker Hack

Do you have one rug in your house and you would rather not have to invest in a hoover just for that?  Are you happy just sticking with a sweeping brush? Maybe you do have a hoover but those short, pesky little dog hairs seem to get stuck in the rug and just won’t lift out?

On short pile rugs, there is a great hack that you could try that can work brilliantly at lifting embedded pet hair and it also gives your legs a great work out too!

Put on a good pair of rubber soled sneakers and systematically start running the sneaker firmly down the length of the rug.  You will find that, as long as you apply a decent amount of pressure, the hairs start to pile under your foot and then you can just drag the mound to the edge of the rug to then sweep them away.  It works fantastically well and it gives your leg muscles a bit of pounding at the same time.

Dog Breeds That are Known For Their Excess Shedding

There are some breeds that shed a lot more than others.  Whilst any dog hairs can cause problems for those with allergies or asthma if the dog sheds excessively then this is likely to exacerbate the condition more.  They will also be the ones that will result in your home needing more regular hoovering.

Some of the big shedders include the large Northern Breeds like Malamutes, Huskies and Akitas. Corgis and Chow Chows also shed excessively although they are perhaps not such popular breeds.

The popular breeds that are known for shedding include German Shepherds, Labrador and Golden Retrievers.  But even short-coated breeds like Jack Russell Terriers can leave short, spiky hairs embedded into carpet and furnishings that can be tricky to remove without a really good quality hoover.

German Shepherds are known for being prolific shedders 

For the breeds that shed a lot, it may also be worth investing in a de-shedding tool like a Furminator as these are very effective at removing the dead hair from the coat and will hopefully reduce the amount of excess hair that is left lying around the house.

There are also breeds that do not really moult and whilst we would never recommend opting for a dog just because of their lack of shedding it can be useful to consider if someone in the household has asthma or allergies.  Some of the popular non-shedding breeds include Poodles, Bichon Frise, Schnauzers, the Portuguese and Spanish Water Dogs and the Maltese.  There are even breeds with almost no hair like the American Hairless Terrier!

If you have a non-shedding breed like a poodle your hoover requirements might not be quite as desperate!

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